On a death and a birth

The resident took me aside before the procedure. She asked me if I have ever seen a D&E, or dilation and evacuation. I shook my head, it was my first day on the gynecologic surgery service and this D&E would be my second procedure.

“When we remove the fetus, it is going to come out in parts. If you feel yourself getting light-headed or faint, just take care of yourself and sit down or leave.”

I thanked her for the escape hatch.

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On the first trimester (or baby chronicles: Part One)

March 21, 2018
4weeks 5days gestation

We found out on Wednesday, the second week of the Surgical Clerkship. Mackenzi took a urine pregnancy test the day before, but the results were inconclusive. I felt like I knew the weekend prior that she was with child. I didn’t tell her, though.

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On a busy night (or Women’s Health/Pediatrics: a post-mortem)

For the most part, my week of nights on Labor & Delivery was quiet. Saturday night, then Monday night, and finally Tuesday night. Then, a day of standardized patient interviews on Thursday and the final exam on Friday leading me into Spring Break.

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On a tale of two births (or life in Labor & Delivery)

The scrub nurse kicked me out of the OR twice: once for not wearing a facemask with eye protection and twice for wearing a ring. Once finally scrubbed in and gowned up, I found my place next to the attending on the patient’s left side, while the resident and scrub nurse placed themselves on her right. The conscious patient separated from us by a drape, with the anesthetists conversing with her and checking in regularly. More drapes covered her lower body, exposing the lower portion of her gravid belly.

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On parental practice and burnout measures (or the beginning of Women’s Health/Pediatrics)

Outpatient OB/GYN has progressed surprisingly well. Fellow male medical students tell me they spent more time outside of the patient rooms than inside of them. With my preceptors, I’ve only been asked to step outside once or twice a day. Far less than I had been expecting. I’m honored each time a patient allows me to participate in their care.

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