Katrina Wachter On Death


Katrina Wachter! Katrina is a 24yo third year medical student, a musician, a second Lieutenant in the US Army, and a Christian. I’ve known her since the very first days of med school as she is my peer pair partner for the SELECT program. She’s an outstanding example of a human and I am so glad to finally bring her to you. During this conversation, we discuss the value of deep breathing and journaling, her encounters with death, and her desires for a family.

I hope you enjoy! 😀

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On a tale of eight data points (or Step One: a post-mortem)

20170203CBSE178
20170401CBSSA Form 16175
20170409CBSSA Form 15203
20170412CBSE205
20170416CBSSA Form 18192
20170422CBSSA Form 17205

UWorld 56% (cumulative correct)

20170519Step One209

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On the clinical grind (or the cost of earned knowledge)

The glamour of last week, the beginning of clinical rotations, has worn off. Now, the fatigue settles in and I’ve already found myself wishing for no-show patients. I only need to see one or two patients in a morning, not the primary care marathon of a patient every fifteen minutes for the entire day, every day of the week.

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Joel Eisenberg On Death


Joel Eisenberg! Joel is a 25yo third year medical student, a native of Florida, and lover of food. I’ve rotated with Joel throughout medical school and I’m excited to bring him to you. During this conversation, we discuss authenticity, how culinary school is more intense than medical school, and how his mother taught him about death.

I hope you enjoy!

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On mixed findings (or the beginning of Internal Medicine)

This week, I have heard aortic valve stenosis, observed a masterful tobacco cessation counseling session, and asked an avalanche of questions. I’ve also seen a physician stare at his computer and issue clipped, close-ended questions to a frustrated Spanish-speaking patient.

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